Either there is a veil of silence covering the world of finance, or the obvious parallels between electrical engineering (EE) have been overlooked.   I suspect the former.

Almost every EE worth their salt has been exposed to the concepts of signals and signal processing in undergrad.  From signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) to filters (dB/decade) to digital signal processors (DSPs), EE’s are trained to be experts at receiving the signal in spite of the noise.  More technobabble (but its not!) are the Fourier and Laplace transforms we routinely use to analyze the propagation of signals through circuits.  Not to mention wave-guides, complex-conjugate reflections, amplitude- and frequency- modulation, etc.   Then there are the concepts of signal error detection, error correction, and information content.

My point is that financial firms made a mistake in hiring more physicists than electrical engineers.  At the end of the day (or the project) the work of the EE has to stand up to more than just academic scrutiny; it has to stand up to the real world — real products, real testing, real use.

EE’s with years of experience have been there and done that.  Mind you, most are not interested in finance.  However, a handful of us are deeply interested in finance and investing.

These thoughts occurred to me as I was listening to speakers I built 15 years ago.  They still sound spectacular (unglaublich gut, for you Germans).  They are now my second-tier speakers relegated to computer audio.  Naturally, I have an amp fed by Toslink 48K/s 20-bit per channel audio data. My point is that these speakers have audio imaging that is achieved by a smooth first-order crossover with tweaters/speakers chosen to support phase-accurate performance over a the frequencies that the human ear can best make use of audio imaging.

My second point is that a lot of engineering went into these speakers.   This engineering goes beyond electrical.   Speakers are fundamentally in the grey region between mechanical and electrical engineering.  However the mechanical parameters can be “mapped” into the “domain” of electrical engineering concepts.  This positions EEs to pick the best designs and combine them in most advantageous designs  on a maximum value- per-dollar basis.

This post is targeting a different audience than most.  Apologies.  An EE with a CS (computer science) background is an even better choice..

The analysis of financial data as concurrent, superimposed discrete waveforms is natural to EEs as air is to mammals and water is is to fish.  Audio is, perhaps, the simplest application.   Just Google “Nyquist-Shannon” if you want to know of which I speak.

I’m not for hire — I only do contract work.  I’m just telling hiring managers to both broaden and restrict their search criteria.  A well-qualified EE with financial expertise and a passion for finance is likely to be a a better candidate than a Ph.D. in Physics.  Don’t hire Sheldon Cooper until you evaluate Howard Wolowitz (not an EE, but you get my point, I hope).

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